Category Archives: Members

Getting To Know Al Goldstein

by Stuart Kaplan

What makes PPTC unique and special are the traditions of the club. One person who is responsible for some of these traditions is Al Goldstein, who served as the President of PPTC from 1990-1996. I should have known when I got off the phone with Al the night before the final eponymous speed series that driving him to the race would be an experience to remember.  At 97 not only was he able to give me directions to his home from mine, but also he informed me that he still drives but is not allowed to drive to the race or as he said, “ Tom won’t let me drive.”

When I picked him up I felt like I was talking to an old friend. Al starts a conversation as if you’ve known him for years, and as I drove him to the race I began to understand why he is a patriarch to our club.  As we drove to the park, Al and I talked while he gave me the fastest directions to the park including where to turn to drive into the park, even where to leave my car — true VIP status. I was with a legend, and as humble as he is about it, you could see how respected he is, as members of PPTC came up to him to shake his hand.  I was lucky enough to hear the stories about Al’s running, and why he is so important to our club.

Running at 57 and the marathons

Al didn’t start running until he was 57. His first love was basketball. Al got the “bug” for running when he bet someone he could run a mile in 6 minutes at the Lincoln High School Track.  The first time Al ran the NYC Marathon, the longest he had run before was 13 miles.  Between the age of 57 and 73, Al has run 18 marathons.

NYC Marathon -11 times

Boston Marathon – 6 times

Long Island Marathon-1 times

When Al was training for marathons, he never had a dedicated day for speed or hills. He always ran his 8-mile pace, and would incorporate hills into his runs. He used a regular watch (these were the pre-Garmin/pre-Strava days). Al said on marathon day aim slower, you will finish faster. He also said he never ran the day before the race. When Al was running marathons in the 80s it was harder to qualify for Boston. He said to qualify for Boston in the ‘80s you had to finish a marathon twenty minutes faster then you have to finish today.

[Editorial note: Here are the BQ standards for men and women in the 1980s

1980

MEN WOMEN (ALL DIVISIONS)
19 – 39: 2hrs 50min 3hrs 20min
40 and over: 3hrs 10min

1981-1983

19 – 39: 2hrs 50min 19 – 39: 3hrs 20min
40 – 49: 3hrs 10min 40 and over: 3hrs 30min
50 – 59: 3hrs 20min
60 and over: 3hrs 30min

1984-1986

19 – 39: 2hrs 50min* 19 – 39: 3hrs 20min
40 – 49: 3hrs 10min 40 – 49: 3hrs 30min
50 – 59: 3hrs 20min 50 – 59: 3hrs 40min
60 and over: 3hrs 30min 60 and over: 3hrs 50min

1987-1989

18 – 39: 3hrs 00min 18 – 39: 3hrs 30min
40 – 49: 3hrs 10min 40 – 49: 3hrs 40min
50 – 59: 3hrs 20min 50 – 59: 3hrs 50min
60 and over: 3hrs 30min 60 and over: 4hrs 00min

end of editorial note]

Renting schools after the NYC Marathon

Because Al was an elementary school principal, he knew that you could rent schools on the weekends and thus began the PPTC tradition of renting a school by the finish line near Central Park. He would line the locker rooms with towels so his runners could shower and relax after the marathon.  One year he even made five gallons of vegetable soup. When I asked him why he did this he said “I knew how great it was to have hot soup and a shower after a race.”

Teaching his students the joys of running

The best thing he did as a principal was teach every student how to run a mile.  He taught his students valuable life lessons as he taught them to run.  He told them run the mile if you feel like you have to stop walk but don’t stop running.  He even taught his students how to pace. He said you need two leaders. One leader to set the pace, and the other to check that everyone is running with that leader. If anyone runs ahead, they have to sit down.  This taught the students not to run too fast. After they learned how to run a mile, he would let them compete. He gave medals to every student who finished their race whether they ran or walked.  Later on in life, some of his students qualified for Boston by finishing the NYC Marathon in 2 hours and 50 minutes.

Running in the Heat

We also talked about running through the heat. He told a story about when he became victim to the heat during the Boston Marathon. He finished that marathon in 3h and 47 seconds as opposed to his usual marathon time of 3h 27seconds. Then five days after Boston, Al finished 5th place in his age group for the National 5K in Prospect Park. So being that there has been so much discussion about hot weather running and races that don’t go as planned I asked him how he was able to do it. This is what he said, “ I jogged every day instead of running my usual 8 minute mile and had self confidence.”

A Gift from Al

After the race, Al gave me one of his medals, which is an honor to have. Al directed me out of the park we continued to talk about running.  When I dropped him off he thanked me for driving him. I thanked him for the souvenir and for the privilege and honor of getting to know him.   He reminded me that at 97 he still drives, but Tom wouldn’t let him drive to the race.

If you would like to read more about our past PPTC presidents, including Al Goldstein, please read this page.

Meet Your Team Captains

by Jana Trenk

Did you know that PPTC has four team captains? Captains work to bring team unity, as well as plan, organize and lead programs and group activities. Our current team captains are Michael Koplin, Linda Ewing, Adam Devine and Missy Burgin.  Read their bios to learn a little more about them! If you need to reach them, you can contact the captains by email at team@pptc.org

Michael Koplin

Michael Koplin

I started running in May 2010 when I was 63 years old.  After losing weight, my routine exercise of walking morphed into running.  I quickly fell in love.  I ran the Baltimore Marathon in October 2011 with my cousin and then joined PPTC.  Since my first race in 2011 I’ve completed over 160 races, including 7 marathons.  I have always enjoyed the competition and fellowship of the running community.

Over the past 6 years I’ve witnessed and participated in the development of many PPTC runners and consider our team competitive and able to run against all other teams.

One of my goals has been to encourage our Masters runners to participate in NYRR team points races and other races.  We have an amazing group of Masters runners that bring honor to the PPTC colors.  Of course, our younger runners are quite extraordinary and I always look forward to seeing them compete against the best of the other running clubs.

I am a USA Track & Field (USATF) Level-1 Coach, National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) Certified Interscholastic Level-2 Coach, and have a US Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association Track & Field Technical Coaching Certification.   I’m also a Track & Cross Country Coach at St. Edmund Preparatory High School.

Being a co-captain of the PPTC Men’s Team is an honor and I am thrilled to work on behalf of our club and its great group of runners.

Linda Ewing

Linda Ewing

I was a latecomer to running, nagged into it by a couple of friends who watched me walking on the treadmill and tried to persuade me to run instead. I thought that if I ran a few times to demonstrate that I hated and was bad at it, I’d shut them up. (It seemed a safe bet, since at age 35, my only prior running experience was a mandatory, torturous mile back in high school phys ed.)

To my surprise, I liked it.

Over the next 20+ years (gulp), my motivations for running changed – from weight loss to fun to friendship to (modest) competitiveness as a member of Motor City Striders and the Front Line Racing Team – until, finally, running was simply part of my identity. When I moved to Brooklyn from Detroit, I was thrilled to discover in PPTC the running club of my dreams, a combination training group, racing team, roving gastronomic society and all-around great community.

My PR days (19:21 5K, 1:29:21 Half Marathon, 3:15:32 Marathon) are behind me, but I love running as much as ever (if not more so). While I feel a special bond with my fellow masters runners, I especially love watching members who are new to running fall in love with the sport and run faster than they ever imagined they could. I see our role as captains as being to support and encourage *all* our members, whatever their pace, as they chase their racing goals.

Adam Devine

Adam Devine

I have been a club member since May of 2015, and at this point, it is hard to imagine how I survived so long without y’all. I had a bit of running experience back in my early 20’s, but was hit by a car while cycling back in 2008, and that put a damper on my running for a bit. Sara signed us up for the Brooklyn Half back in 2015, and we both had terrible races. But we both saw how much fun PPTC members seemed to be having, and decided we wanted some of whatever Kool-aid you all were drinking.

Since then I have gotten more serious about running, completing a few marathons and a handful of ultra-marathons. I’m also trying to get a bit faster, and am inching towards my goal of breaking 20 minutes in the 5k. I owe almost all of my improvements to the support and motivation I get from the club.

My favorite part about being a captain is getting to be a cheerleader for my teammates. I have gotten to know so many more members, and can’t get enough of screaming for them and banging away on my cowbell to cheer them to success. I am a better runner and a better person due to my membership in the club, and I can’t wait to share many more miles with everyone in the future.

Missy Burgin

Missy Burgin

With my Midwest sensibilities in tow, I joined PPTC in 2013 after moving to Brooklyn.  I was looking for new training buddies (friends) and found so much more. I’m a long time runner and natural motivator, and since my middle school days, friends and teammates have looked to me for advice and encouragement.  I’ve been a driving force in the creation and continuance of the Marathon Training Group (MTG), and beyond my Team Captain duties, I enjoy giving back to the club by helping put on PPTC races and serving on the Board of Directors.

When not running, you can find me frolicking around Prospect Heights eating ice cream (year round), making small batch pickles & jams, and laughing my way through life.

I’m always looking for new training partners, so don’t forget to invite me out for a run!

Training Goals:  3:07 marathon & being as good of a cowbeller as Adam Devine.

Meet the #PickMePPTC Winners

by Jana Trenk

PPTC was offered three guaranteed entry spots for the 2017 NYC Marathon. Using the hashtag #PickMePPTC, interested members were asked to submit a selfie and write up via social media explaining why they wanted to run this year’s marathon.

Congratulations to our contest winners: Noah, Jennifer, and Carlos! Wishing them the best of luck for an amazing training cycle and marathon.

I asked each of them to tell us a little more about themselves.  You can read about them below:

Noah Devereaux

Noah Devereaux

I’ve been a runner for a little over a year but really started getting serious after I impulsively joined Oren and Leiba on a 15 mile run to the Rockaways last July. Somehow it seemed like a good idea even though I’d never run more than 10 miles in one go before. After surviving that I started to get ideas that maybe I could actually do a marathon myself. A year later running has become such an important part of my life that it’s been easy to get motivated even before I got chosen to run New York. But now that I do have the marathon to train for I have a better excuse to run so much with all my friends in the club.

The part of the marathon I’m most looking forward to is passing Peter Pan Doughnuts in Greenpoint. Back when I lived in the neighborhood I would sit outside the shop and watch the marathon with my friends and wonder why all these people were choosing to suffer so much. Funny how things change. It’ll be hard to resist the urge to stop and get a doughnut in the middle of the race.

Jennifer Bolstad

Jennifer Bolstad

I started running when I was in 6th grade… so… over 30 years ago. I competed in cross country, indoor and outdoor track from junior high through college and between college and grad school. Then I took a 10-year hiatus from all athletic activity because I didn’t have the time or the will to train hard enough to stay in competitive shape, and — hubris alert! — I felt that “recreational” running was beneath me. I started running again in 2008 when a friend dared me to sign up for the Brooklyn Half with her. Soon after I got back into running, I was diagnosed with breast cancer at the tender age of 32. I kept running all through treatment and it was my way of making friends with my body again; of showing myself it could do good things, too, when it wasn’t trying to kill me. That experience really got me over any feelings of being ashamed that I’m not as fast as I used to be (it’s pretty humbling to come in close to DFL in a giant NYRR race!) and helped me to just accept that running is its own reward, independent of the time on your watch or your place in the pack. Now I run to maintain my healthy relationship with my body and my healthy relationship with running itself.

I’m most looking forward to training with my fellow PPTCers. There’s really nothing I enjoy more than long runs, exploring the five boroughs with my teammates. I recently read an article about how difficult it is to make true friends, as opposed to just mere acquaintances, as an adult. Most people don’t find the time to just hang out for long stretches with no agenda other than talking to each other. As I was reading, I kept thinking… none of this is true! I definitely have many deep friendships that have developed in just this way: through the luxury of lots and lots of agenda-free conversations. Then I realized that almost all of those conversations were with my PPTC teammates on our runs.

Carlos Vazquez

Carlos Vazquez

I started running in 2005. My girlfriend at the time (who is now my wife), told me about a local 5k in Orlando and how much fun they were. I looked up a training plan, similar to Couch to 5k, and trained for a couple of months.  Not knowing my pace, I ran it conservatively in 35 minutes, with tons of energy to spare.  After that, I never ran slower than 25 minutes and I was hooked.

I realize when I stop running, or do nothing physical, I feel restless. Running keeps me both mentally and physically fit. Signing up for races also motivates my training. Plus, being part of a running group, like PPTC, keeps me socially active.

Besides running over the Verrazano and the cheering crowds, there is that brief period in Queens, where we will run where I grew up as a kid. I went to school a few blocks away from the Queensboro bridge and it will add to the memories growing up there.

Ask A Runner” How do you handle Hot Summer Running?

By Stuart Kaplan

Disclaimer: The Advice given in this blog is from the experiences of the runners who completed a survey. This information has not been endorsed by PPTC

I will never forget that humid day in June when I ran the Queens 10K. Humidity got me. I fell victim to summer running when I began to black out 100 ft before the finish line. Even though I finished that race (not remembering crossing the finish line), the pictures are proof that heat and humidity got the best of me that day.

Even the most experienced runners have to modify their running to handle the hot weather. According to Kristen Dold of Runner’s World, “science says training in the heat is worth the trouble: Hot-weather workouts teach your body to sweat more, increase your blood-plasma volume, and lower your core body temperature- all adaptations that help you perform better in any weather.” Although this can all lead to improvements in running, from my own experience, it can also be a pain when summer running is also training for that big race in the fall.

Summer running can truly challenge us.  In my own experience changes in pace and dehydration have both been challenges that I have had to deal with. In order to overcome these challenges, I try to get up earlier to run. The later it gets, the hotter it gets. On those hot days I know my pace won’t be the same, I spend more time concentrating on my form, my breathing, and pay closer attention to my hydration. I read an article in Runner’s World “Six Ways to Run Long and Strong in the Heat” by Jenny Hadfield. She  makes the point, “In the heat concentrate on effort not pace.” I am learning to listen to my body. If I need I slow down especially if I’m running in the direction of the sun.

On hot days I also like to rehydrate with a Nuun after my run.  Hydration should be a constant even on those off days. A friend of mine gave me great advice. She said that during a race on a hot day she took some cold water and poured it on the back of her neck and her wrists. By doing this she said her body temperature began to decrease, and her pace then increased.  I have found in my own experience that doing this helps.

We recently sent out a survey asking runners in PPTC about their experiences with running in high temperature and humidity.  Out of the 30 responses, 18 runners (60%) said their biggest challenge was the change in pace. Seventeen people (56%) said that dehydration created challenges for them. These two issues can truly affect training. Read more to learn about their challenges with summer running, the ways in which they have overcome these challenges, and some advice and takeaways on ways we can better prepare ourselves for running in hot weather.

Roshan –Member of PPTC for two months: Challenges- The Heat, Motivation, and Preparing for a Race

 It’s hard to get up early enough to beat the heat! But I know I need to get out there for marathon training. Group runs help with motivation but it can be hard going to bed early on a weekend to get up early the next day. I’ve started to try and plan more interesting routes and explore parts of the city that I don’t usually get to anymore. I had a 12 mile run recently and decided to map it out that I did a nice route in Manhattan ended at Pier 11. I live in Brooklyn Heights and took the ferry back after the run. It was the greatest feeling to sit on top and feel the breeze. It was fun! Helps with my motivation when I feel like I have a good run regardless of heat or motivation.

Noah – Member of PPTC for one year. Challenges:  Dehydration, Changes in Pace

 I had to slow down when it first got hot.  It took about a month to get workout paces back up to the level they were in the spring. Had to remember to drink water regularly but not too much at one time. Nuun tablets and coconut water are lifesavers. Electrolytes are real.

 

Jana- Member of PPTC for two years –Challenges: Dehydration, Changes in Pace, Preparing for a race

Last year I was well trained for the 2015 Boston Marathon. The weather was very hot and humid on race day. I went out at my originally planned pace and ended up dehydrated and in the medical tent at Mile 8. I was devastated and that night I signed up for the Vermont City Marathon a few weeks later. On the day, it was 88 degrees and sunny. I was able to finish that marathon, but the heat really got to me and my time was an hour slower than my goal! Often times, I have felt sluggish and thirsty during hot weather days.” I began to do most of my summer runs very early in the morning before the sun was out. I accept that my pace may be slower on a hot day. If it is extremely hot on one day, I might move my long run to the next day. Overall, being flexible, being kind to myself and adjusting my expectations for time when needed.

Advice

  • Adjust your time expectations–set a slower goal time.
  • Run by effort, not by pace because the heat WILL affect your pace.
  • Be kind to yourself. If the weather is not ideal for a race, it’s ok if you so not perform at your full potential.
  • Hydrate well before, during and after a run on a hot day.
  • Bring water with you so you can drink while running on a hot day. Whether it is a hydration pack or handheld bottle–just make sure you stay hydrated.
  • Run very early in the morning or late in the evening to avoid the sun beating down on you.
  • Wear light and breathable clothing.

Questions:

  • For a goal race, exactly how much should you adjust your time goal based on the temperature?
  • Does the heat have a greater effect on race result when the distance is longer? I noticed that I’m better able to run a fast 5k on a hot day than a fast marathon.

Rachel Member of PPTC for four months.  Challenges: The Heat, Motivation

In the hot weather, I never want to go outside let alone run, the heat kills my motivation and makes me feel exhausted all the time. Run very early, run shorter distances more often rather than one long run (too draining), and HYDRATE so much. I also like to use Emergen-C tab before runs and organic Gatorade (it’s really tasty!) after runs. Recovery after runs is really important for me in the heat, getting the right nutrition afterward. I also let myself nap after weekend runs to re-energize. it’s made me more methodical in how I plan my weekly runs and how I recover from runs. It also made me less afraid to just get out there even if I think I may not be able to finish my distance or get the pace I want. 

Advice: Give yourself extra time to prepare, get out earlier, and take a longer recovery.

Questions: Is there ever a temperature/humidity index/air quality alert that you really shouldn’t run in? What are the warning signs that you should look for in case you’ve pushed yourself too hard in the heat?

Sam: Member of PPTC for 1yr 4months-Challenges: The Heat, and Motivation

I found that getting out to run is the hardest thing about running during hot and humid summer days. Once laced up and outside, it’s one foot front of another. Then heat and humidity hit you and I’m drenched in my own sweat. It’s more of mental challenge from there on than physical since once my mind says it’s too hot, my body tends to break down and doesn’t want to move. However, when I’m mentally strong as sometimes I am, it becomes much better run than a winter day. I carry a bottle water during the run and I wet my head with cold water. If I’m running in the park, I stop by the Center Drive and wet my head. I’m not sure if I’m improving as a runner but having committed to running at least two miles a day no matter the weather condition has got me out and do the daily run. I’m able to run much better in the heat and humidity that before so I guess I have improved running in the hot and humid days.

Advice:  Wet your head down with cold water to cool down. But most of all, slow down. It’s much easier to run your distance by slowing your pace than trying to run fast so you can get out of the heat. Also, you are still getting your workout by going the distance.

Adam Member of PPTC 6 months-Challenges: The Heat, Dehydration

Counterintuitively I am a more consistent runner in the summer. My biggest obstacle is running before sunrise, so with the long summer days, I don’t find it difficult to get in the miles. I started running in Atlanta, GA where hot, humid days are the norm. However you have to stay hydrated if you want to train and heat-adapt successfully.

It is so important to stay hydrated. Don’t just hydrate before you go out. You should be hydrating consistently on your off-days, when you go to bed, and when you wake up in the morning. I have an insulated water bottle that I load up with ice and keep with me all day. I think the key is to have consistent fluid intake rather than a quick spike in fluids right before a run. If you overload your system all at once, you’ll just pee the water right back out. Staying hydrated has kept my pace consistent during summer training. I find that I don’t need to slow down much unless I’m running at 1 or 2 in the afternoon (and why on Earth would you do that)?

Advice: Stay hydrated every day, even when you are not running. Try to find routes with shade, and either bring water or plan a route that has water fountains available.

Lillian- Member of PPTC 2 Yrs Challenges: The Heat

I’m very much a fair weather runner. I know heat and humidity affect everyone, but I’m disproportionately affected, in particular with humidity. I slow waaaay down.

 I spent more time doing heat adaptation – more slow running in the heat. It’s not about the miles or the pace, but just time spent under the sun, so when I need to run fast, I’m more used to warm temperatures. Also, I freeze water in a Simple Hydration bottle (for which I’m a brand ambassador because I love this product so much). The ice melts during the run so I have icy cold water to drink and to sprinkle over my head. It helps to cool me.

I ran my fastest AGSS last week on one of the hottest days of the year. I didn’t wilt under the heat the way I did all summer long last year. I’m running faster under warmer temperatures, which bodes well for fall racing.

Advice: Oh, the usual advice of try to run during cooler times of the day, drink lots of water, remember your electrolytes, and back off the pace. Now is not the time to summon your inner Eliud Kipchoge.

Anonymous: Challenge: The Heat, Motivation

It’s frustrating to have to slow down so much and have a higher RPE. I don’t like to run really early in the morning, but it gets tough later in the day, especially with long runs.

I do end up trying to run earlier on long runs. I try to be forgiving of myself when it comes to hitting all of my pace goals and expect easy days to be a lot slower. Running with other people helps in terms of motivation.

I started marathon training last summer when there were a lot of really hot days. I doubted my ability to meet my marathon goals a lot, but having gone through that tough summer helped me cultivate patience and some necessary grit.

Advice: I think you should still work to have quality workouts, but I think some things might have to give in the heat. For example, even if you have a handheld water bottle, you will probably have to stop during your long run to fill it up. Adjusting your expectations can be helpful. You can expect to go slower than what you’d like and still expect to do well in the fall.

Anonymous: Challenges: The Heat, Dehydration

I find myself really nauseous after long runs. Also–I try to run early in the morning (6 am) so it’s sometimes a struggle to get out of bed

I am more responsible about hydration and electrolytes. I drink a lot of water (and Nuun) the day before an the morning of. I swear by the Endurolytes Extreme salt pills, one before my run, and one for every hour I’m running to ensure I don’t suffer from electrolyte balance. I also make sure I have a simple snack (like a PB sandwich, some leftover pasta, or a piece of fruit) waiting for me at the end.

Advice: Listen to your body, don’t feel bad about slowing down, and drink water well before you’re thirsty!

Questions: Any suggestions for quick-ready to eat snacks for before/after runs? Also–summer running clothes are tiny–how do you carry your nutrition?

Isaac Member of PPTC 1.5.yrs- Challenges: Heat, Changes in pace

Long weekend runs start at 6:00 am

Articles to read:

Tips for Training in Hot Weather” By Kristen Dold

 “Six ways to Run Long and Strong in the Heat” by Jenny Hadfield

Intraclub Competition – a “race” between friends

It has been established that PPTC has some of the best runners in the city as evidenced by our number 4 ranking for both men and women in the 2015 Club Points standings. (GO TEAM!)

But let’s make things a little bit more interesting. This year, the Team Captains are rolling out a new intraclub competition.

PPTC Group Shot

To participate, you need simply to be a member of PPTC and run as many of the 11 NYRR Club Points races as you can. You can learn about those here.

Your score is based on your age grade in each race; your lowest race will be dropped, and the highest will count double. The total sum is the final ranking.

Coming up, we have the the Pride Run 5-miler on June 25 (sold out), the NYRR Team Championships: Women and Men on July 30 and the Percy Sutton Harlem 5K on August 27. Results through the Retro 4-Miler, which was the last Club Points race are below.

The intraclub champion will be announced and honored at the PPTC Awards Dinner.

Here are the final standings!

Last NameFirst NameTotalRacesHigh
GebhardtDean865.31081.0
EwingLinda596.2776.0
brownmarcia552.9680.2
UbillaDan550.1864.2
WeinerHope535.01050.8
GodduHolly530.2861.6
DeMascoRobert521.9861.4
RinehartEmily509.5767.5
CohenNicholas499.8764.6
VickersNed496.1765.3
MatzJennie495.1764.6
SUCREsheldon490.51052.4
OlneyDouglas490.3861.6
DevineAdam482.8762.1
RosenblithMurray468.5854.9
EfratiOren458.5666.9
LyonsJoe449.8666.8
LundyJoseph Francis448.1854.2
CollierBen444.0575.7
StepniowskiMarek441.7665.2
WIGGSLOUIS439.5758.7
KnauerLisa Maya431.8756.6
JohnstonMary408.1570.3
WeigelKathryn407.8660.4
WilliamsKeith404.9569.1
ChaseHolly390.0566.3
DalyPatricia386.7566.6
WoodyearLee383.0565.5
BarnerYvetta380.2565.2
CaballesEfren378.9567.6
NelsonBrandon378.3564.7
TobinTom375.0564.5
ZarrilloJohn371.6564.8
JohnsonChristy369.8655.9
TsaoClifford366.8563.3
IsimingerHeather364.8654.2
DevineSara358.9652.7
PagedasElizabeth358.9653.5
ProutLee358.5560.5
TrenkJana352.1475.8
NuzzelaJohnny343.7472.1
JonesAndrew342.3559.6
QamarAisha339.8470.1
FleischauerJason339.1560.3
BulgerGarin337.1559.0
PernaRosalba334.9469.1
GuertlerHenning333.0558.3
GottliebJanet332.5649.5
WongAndy324.2558.7
AnielloAlicia321.7555.7
BolstadJennifer321.1465.4
josephsonisaac319.5555.2
DaltonKate318.5464.9
MaxwellEdward317.9555.3
FoxDutch317.1464.6
KnechtMatt315.8468.5
BeganLiana315.0555.1
WilliamsPeta-Gaye313.7463.5
SklarenTyrone312.8466.0
NeesemannLisa311.7648.3
CraneWilliam311.7558.3
UhrichKristen310.8467.2
QuintanaMaria Elena307.6378.3
LunaGerard306.8462.9
SchwartzBrian306.7463.0
WhitfieldEmily304.9377.2
LeungChun304.7553.5
ValienteMiguel302.7462.1
O'FlahertyRory299.3462.9
FelicettiGina298.2460.8
YotovKamen295.6557.1
KotkovFrances293.6461.0
LevaviEtan290.6374.3
CantarellaClaudia287.9552.6
GarciaAurelio287.9461.0
GallopSpencer287.4373.1
ShawSaima284.9641.4
LewisKathleen283.0457.6
ValentinoJonathan280.6460.7
FluerasuAndrei279.7371.5
PythonTifenn278.2370.2
ButlerLeslie277.4640.9
ShieldsTimothy276.4370.8
PoorKatherine275.0369.0
FloresArnulfo273.7371.3
HangPaFoua273.6456.2
WeeksBrittany270.3455.7
RiveraEvelyn269.4455.1
RimlerLeiba267.1367.8
EllisTony266.9368.2
MarksElyse264.6367.6
Maurusmeghan262.9456.6
PalazzoloLaura262.2458.8
TrevethanNate261.3365.7
ImporticoNicole258.7365.4
McNaughtonPatricia258.2454.3
PurdyGary256.3365.5
DiasRicardo255.8454.2
TurnerCaroline255.6452.5
ChanRegina255.5456.6
HersheyErnie253.7369.7
NalesRosa250.3364.6
LyLinus249.6546.7
CramerCarmen246.6363.5
SmithLisa246.5362.1
ImhofAndrea246.2282.1
SilverMichael243.1361.8
SerranoJorge243.0362.1
RigbyJeff241.7361.5
RichardsonZadine239.4453.0
FabianDave238.5362.1
JaeckelJohann233.2450.2
SaltzmanTanya232.8360.5
Almiron MDNoel231.1358.5
ColemanGeorgina230.2540.5
dorval-mollermadeleine230.0359.4
StarrMichelle226.7357.8
DeschampsMaggie225.4275.8
WatsonAnthony225.3276.8
BalickLawrence224.0357.2
HaqShan223.0274.6
YoonJane221.7358.7
LeungJimmy221.0357.7
GoossensFrederic219.8355.8
HodgsonLiesje218.5273.3
FuranoKimberly218.2355.2
VarnerEliza218.2357.4
DapsanseStephane216.4357.7
ReevesJoelle215.4271.8
ROMEROTRICIA215.0354.1
LairdEdward Morgan213.5357.5
FuldJanice212.5354.0
DaversaKristin212.3354.7
CandellaEunjung210.9354.0
QuealySean208.9271.0
ChoiChristopher208.3270.8
FoxLeslie207.3352.6
DrabinskiEmily202.1353.6
O'ConnellDavid201.2267.2
CrowleyMary200.9267.5
JoeJoeTanya200.5352.7
SpiegelMollie199.9350.4
HinerRoss198.5266.8
MeyersonElyse198.3351.2
CoAllan197.8266.3
LynchColleen197.7267.1
gagnedominique197.6267.0
HuangPatrick197.1352.1
RoulandChris196.8268.5
CavalleriMatteo194.2264.9
AbraszekKevin194.1265.7
MarteOsiris194.0348.6
CrichtonHilary192.0264.4
LittrellJoseph190.0264.5
DeLeoFrank189.4264.2
McCaveRobert189.2264.1
gohChristine188.7350.3
McShaneEileen187.9263.3
Kohler-BrittonCharlene187.7265.9
TealSusie185.6262.2
HingValarie185.5264.0
MacLeanLauren185.3347.6
UrenaChristian184.9439.8
HarrisJohn183.8261.9
WeltSarah183.4347.0
BarzottoLisa183.3261.8
LawtonHilary181.4260.5
KalanzOlga180.7260.6
LeeMichael178.9345.1
PiatetskyElliot178.9259.9
TrevethanRebecca178.3259.9
ImJeannie176.7260.0
LesterTraci176.5346.1
KanterDavid176.5344.7
CAPPIELLOJAMES176.0258.9
SantosNadia175.2435.8
SEAFORTHJUAN174.1258.2
HugginsSheryl173.2258.0
AllisonBen172.9257.9
GoodmanKael171.9258.0
WeinertElizabeth169.7256.6
KoplinMichael168.7256.3
RagonettiPeter167.9256.3
PodrazaJudy167.7256.1
O'BrienChristopher167.7257.5
SimmonsTonika166.8346.3
ColeAlison166.6256.5
EsrigAdam166.5256.9
WeiherChristine166.3263.0
IngramDavid166.2256.4
SammerDiane165.3255.8
SanchezYanira165.0343.4
BailakanavarMahesh164.5256.8
SpiegelFred164.2341.8
LazarusLaura164.1255.8
LowryErica164.0254.7
EpsteinJennifer162.8255.6
CarrChris162.5255.0
RussellMarisa161.9254.8
StadstadElizabeth161.6254.2
AntoineVeronica161.3256.1
GreenwoodAmy160.9254.8
ReissHoward160.9254.8
FeldmanDaniel160.2254.0
RegueroAnna159.9255.9
KleinbergBennett159.8255.4
newmanirene159.8253.6
DubnoffNeil159.6253.6
SawyerMartin159.0255.5
NAVARRETEMARTIN159.0258.8
LoydRichard158.9254.7
GainesMarissa158.1254.7
McCabeHeather157.5254.7
SmithLaura157.4255.3
BrownJennifer156.9252.4
AMATRIALOREA156.4252.3
DoughertyDan155.9177.9
ComerTye155.0253.1
BrodbeckElisabeth154.8252.7
FishbeinHarry154.3255.4
HerbertColleen153.9176.9
DadarriaKatie152.5251.8
TarhanTiphaine151.6250.9
GurunCamilla151.6251.4
BashoreKate151.5251.7
AmirOrly151.3250.6
EichenlaubRyan150.3250.5
DancherBarry149.9251.8
PauliHilary149.2251.7
OzerZachary148.3250.1
ClarkMatthew146.5173.2
BelcherGary145.3249.4
BurginMelissa144.6172.3
kalemerathoko144.3249.8
WellsAndrea143.4248.6
KeberDamian143.3247.8
DazaFrancisca143.2248.0
GeoghanDennis142.2171.1
MillerBen141.3247.4
ArntsenBjorn140.6170.3
PerilloEmily139.9246.8
Strelzik WiessmannCarly139.7169.9
CarrionLeslie139.0246.9
MulesLynda138.9169.4
AbrahamsMichael138.6169.3
WangGary138.1169.1
SpiteriVincent137.7168.8
CampbellNorma137.5247.1
WongKenneth137.3246.7
pierce brubakercheryl135.9247.8
PavlovicRahmin135.5167.8
LevensteinEric135.4245.4
turleylindsay135.3167.7
LickerCharlotte134.6245.0
LynnClarence134.4167.2
doughertyClaire133.2166.6
GrisaLuca132.4166.2
SiefkerMatt132.3166.2
GreeneKelly132.2166.1
Jara-AlmonteGeoffrey131.7165.9
DeanShea131.1165.6
PowersJeffrey131.1243.8
NamThomas130.6165.3
HartmannNikkie129.5243.9
SHERWINJENNIFER129.1164.6
ScarvaloneMira129.1164.6
WangSherry129.0164.5
BentonTimothy129.0164.5
CullenMeghan128.8164.4
BurkeJustin128.7164.3
TRIMBLETYGHE128.6164.3
OrtnerCraig128.5164.3
FeblesChristopher128.2164.1
Edgerton BlackScott127.4163.7
CandellaRobert126.8242.8
DiersJudith126.8163.4
MaoAndrew126.7163.4
SIEGELLINDA126.3163.1
HammondKatherine126.2163.1
DANCHERNATHAN126.2163.1
ConnellyBrigid125.9242.4
TruongMai125.5162.8
VAN HATTEMPIETER125.3162.6
RobertsRandi125.1162.5
RutovitzSelina124.9162.5
CohenRebecca124.6162.3
CarrollEmily124.2162.1
RingMichael124.2250.3
FavillaThomas124.1162.1
deemegan123.4161.7
DEITZRENA123.1161.6
WenglerJames123.0161.5
wilsonaaron123.0161.5
LyonsRhea122.5161.2
JonesDavid122.3161.1
FongKen122.2161.1
CHIMYUET122.0241.4
VAZQUEZCarlos121.6160.8
HorrittIan121.6160.8
FreeChloe121.4160.7
TaylorChris121.3160.7
MASJEDIMORAD121.2160.6
STANLEYADAM120.8160.4
FleischauerErin120.6160.3
StepniowskaKamila119.6159.8
FleckBenjamin119.0159.5
PhippsTroy118.9159.5
rogeryves118.8159.4
SpratfordScot118.7159.3
AdaManaff118.5159.3
MaddryAlden118.5159.2
WalkerEmma118.4159.2
PhelanJoseph118.1159.1
RounerJonathan118.1159.0
LevineDanielle118.1159.0
NaikAditi117.4158.7
SmithEmily117.1158.6
BaumgartnerJesse117.1158.5
IWAOMAYUMI116.7158.4
WaltherRachel116.6158.3
CorngoldJodie116.4158.2
ParkLillian116.1158.1
LascanoElvis115.8157.9
DekempeMalgorzata115.7157.9
WeinerBruce115.4157.7
ColemanMartin115.2157.6
ThacherJames114.7157.4
HarrisonShauna114.6238.9
McAdamMaegan114.0157.0
NilesIrva113.8238.3
WangJiong113.5156.7
GeiserChris113.3156.6
HelmsTerry113.0156.5
mcenerneyvirginia112.6156.3
Damy MedinaKarla112.1156.1
PRAWDAAL112.1156.0
TanenbaumJenna112.0156.0
BoveMichele111.8155.9
CuevasCipriana111.7155.9
GuidaVanessa111.1155.6
DWYERMAURA110.6155.3
DUQUETTEAMY110.5155.3
CROWELLMARJORIE110.5155.2
ChoJenna110.1155.1
SkillmanCrystal109.9155.0
David-LangTimothy109.7154.9
AsburyJason109.4154.7
KotkovGabrielle109.4154.7
SallonNick109.4154.7
LEVENBERGKAREN109.3154.6
ButlerJeff109.2154.6
DonnellyAnn109.1154.6
NozilYves108.6154.3
FlanaganCristin108.4154.2
McSherryMark108.2154.1
McNabbKimberly107.9154.0
SeisVanessa107.6153.8
MatotoRachel107.3153.7
MaulerTanya107.3153.7
WestcottLucy107.2153.6
LiebermanMichael106.7153.3
DoriaIcaro106.5153.3
GoldbergRyan106.2153.1
RigbyAshley105.9153.0
AlbarilloEmily105.2152.6
SUCHERSCOTT105.1152.5
BrockwellSandy104.8152.4
DietrichAmy104.7152.4
COLEMANDAVID104.7152.3
KolkerCarlyn103.6151.8
LivingstonMelissa103.4151.7
BowersKathrine103.3151.7
FosterAlison102.8151.4
LONGZHEN102.6151.3
CiacciaJuliette102.1151.0
BellDhanya101.4150.7
MarksLori101.2150.6
GreeneThomas100.9150.4
SailerJames100.8150.4
KofflerAaron100.6233.8
AquinoErika99.5149.7
LabradorRoberto99.3149.7
IsraelJames99.0149.5
MaatheyRichard98.9149.5
WUCHUAN-WEI98.9149.4
CohenHolly98.3149.2
DeaneJackie98.0149.0
FloresMarcie97.8148.9
BETTINELLIJULIA97.3148.6
OrekhovAleksey96.4148.2
HodgesSewall94.3147.2
NiemiecErica94.1147.0
GodboleMaya93.9147.0
KarwejnaMichelle93.8146.9
DaielloZulma93.0146.5
OLIVERCHRISTOPHER92.8146.4
SharnakDebbie92.8146.4
HorowitzAbby92.6146.3
YOUJENNY91.4145.7
hudakStacy90.9145.5
WichmanSarah90.7145.4
JakobDavid90.6145.3
WynneJonathan90.6145.3
HossainRumman90.2145.1
MilleurCristina90.0145.0
CabreraVitoria89.6144.8
METROKALORI88.7144.4
MatotoPaolo88.6144.3
CherubinSidney88.2144.1
KoganDorothy87.9144.0
WolfChaya87.5143.7
McInnesMichele87.4143.7
LEUNGWAI84.1142.1
SOWDERAMY83.9141.9
FraserAlyssa83.4141.7
NosenzoAlicia82.9141.5
BurnsErin82.3141.2
KEYSKAREN81.6140.8
SinhaVikas81.5140.8
METROKANICHOLAS81.3140.7
OhJin Min79.9139.9
castrojosephine78.5139.2
TORIBIOMICHAEL77.8138.9
WOLSELEYLORIANNE77.5138.8
ARTOPETUNISIA77.4138.7
DoughertyTheresa77.4138.7
ADAMSJENNIFER77.0138.5
CasimirMagalie76.9138.5
LouickEmily74.7137.4
ZASLAUSTANLEY66.5133.2

PPTC statement on Nick Guerrero

Nick Guerrero paddleboard
On a PPTC trip to the Finger Lakes.

All of us in Prospect Park Track Club were devastated to learn of the critical injuries suffered by Nicholas Guerrero on Monday. A fierce competitor on the course and an enthusiastic teammate on the sidelines, Nick is one of our most popular members.

As a police officer, Nick puts his life on the line day in and day out to protect the public. We have nothing but the highest respect for Nick and his colleagues, and we trust the cowards responsible for his injuries will be punished to the full extent of the law.

For now, however, our only concern is that Nick return to full health as soon as possible. Until that time, our members stand ready to support him and his loved ones in whatever way we can.

Thomas Meany
President, Prospect Park Track Club

 

New Member Group Run September 2014
Nick (kneeling left of wheelchair) at this past Saturday’s New Member run.

On October 11, Run for the Rings

Michael Ring ING NYC Marathon“I walked into my doctor’s office on May 7th…” The way Michael Ring recounts his experience, it sounds like the opening to a Bob Hope joke.

Of course, it’s not. Michael’s been battling Guillain–Barré syndrome and its complications (and writing about it) for four months now, and although he appears poised to head home any day now, the financial effects on his family will linger for a long time.

Here’s one way to support Michael, Stephanie, Sabrina, and Nick: join The Run for the Rings on October 11. You can race in the 5K or half-marathon at Shore Road on the Brooklyn waterfront, or participate from afar using the “virtual” option.

This no-frills nature will ensure Michael and his loved ones receive the maximum benefit from this event.

I don’t need to tell you how valuable Michael is to the New York running community. He’s run the NYC Marathon at least 17 times, occasionally as a pace leader, and takes responsibility for anything he needs to do (whether he’s asked to or not)

And as Vice President of the club, he’s taken on a heroic amount of work – which has become even more apparent since many of his tasks went undone until someone else on the Board said, “Hey, wait a minute – shouldn’t we have sent that email out by now?”

On behalf of the Board, I hope you’ll join us on October 11.

–Keith

Share your PPTC Marathon experience!

Hi, team! Wow, what a day yesterday.

We’re collecting vignettes about members’ experiences. Send a paragraph or two to news at pptc dot org and let us know how it went! Do it now, while the race is fresh in your memory.

If you ran: Congratulations! I hope you don’t live in a fifth-floor walk-up.

If you cheered: Thanks for your support! You made things so much easier – and dare I say, perhaps more fun – for 111 PPTCers and thousands of other runners.

If you did neither: Did you do something fun otherwise?

Hope to see you all tonight at our monthly meeting! 7 p.m., Park Slope Ale House (6th Avenue and 5th Street, NW corner). President Meany has offered to personally escort each runner down the stairs.

New Members Group Run, Saturday, July 20, 8AM

NMGR2

Hey New Members!! Haven’t made it to a Saturday group run yet?  Now is the time! Please join us for our second New Member Group Run on Saturday, July 20th at 8:00 AM at Grand Army Plaza.

Kicking off your fall marathon training? This will be a great opportunity to get in some miles, meet some training buddies, and bounce ideas off of veteran marathoners (because there’s nothing runners love to talk about more than running)!

We’ll run one of our “usual” routes – down Union to Court Street and over the Brooklyn Bridge. From there, anyone looking to run long can loop around Battery Park City before heading back to Brooklyn.

Not training for a marathon, getting back into shape or just starting to run?  We’d love to have you!  There will be a group doing a relaxed loop of the park (3.35 miles).

Concerned about your pace? Don’t be! All paces are welcome. Whether you’re a 7:00 minute miler or a 12:00+ minute miler, we will have various pace leaders to run alongside. Distance is up to you…the pace groups will stop to regroup along the way and you can turn around when you are ready, or go long if you are feeling good!  We’ll stop at water fountains, but it never hurts to carry a water bottle or cash to buy water.

Look for a crowd of runners at Grand Army Plaza, behind the farmer’s market at the entrance to the park. Wear your PPTC colors if you have them!

At the end of our run, join us at Starbucks on 7th Ave between 1st Street and Garfield to keep the party rolling.

(brought to you by the PPTC Social Committee)